William Paul Kilian obituary photo
 
In Memory of

William Paul Kilian

April 27, 1949 - September 3, 2012

Obituary


Born in Chicago, Bill Kilian moved to Hayward in 1962. The best days of his life were as a teenager at family-owned Idlehurst Resort on Round Lake. At age 14, he met his wife, Pat Koerner, at a high school dance where they won a "twist" competition.
Bill's surviving family includes his wife, Pat; children, Matt (Jeanne) Kilian, Angie (Tigger) Lundsten and Brian Kilian; grandchildren, Bryce Kilian, Tressa, McKenna and Brea Lundsten; siblings, Steve (Rose) Kilian, Judy (Dave) Hendricks, and Jim (Michele) Kilian; and special cousin and best friend, Bobby Killian. He was preceded...

Born in Chicago, Bill Kilian moved to Hayward in 1962. The best days of his life were as a teenager at family-owned Idlehurst Resort on Round Lake. At age 14, he met his wife, Pat Koerner, at a high school dance where they won a "twist" competition.
Bill's surviving family includes his wife, Pat; children, Matt (Jeanne) Kilian, Angie (Tigger) Lundsten and Brian Kilian; grandchildren, Bryce Kilian, Tressa, McKenna and Brea Lundsten; siblings, Steve (Rose) Kilian, Judy (Dave) Hendricks, and Jim (Michele) Kilian; and special cousin and best friend, Bobby Killian. He was preceded in death by his parents, Al and Christine Kilian.
Bill was a special man who touched many people. His life was defined by his unwavering faith in God, a deep love for his family, and a joyful willingness to help others. He had an unforgettable smile and a fun sense of humor.
Affectionately known by many as "The Plumber Guy," Bill worked at the Northern Lakes Cooperative Hardware Hank in Hayward for 26 years. During that time, he forged many friendships and genuinely enjoyed helping customers with their home projects. A hard worker who refused to rest until the job was done right, it was fitting that he passed away on Labor Day in the presence of close family.
Throughout his battle with cancer, he never lost hope or optimism. With inspiring courage through difficult medical treatments, he trusted that his temporary struggles were part of God's plan. Bill wanted people to remember him, first and foremost, as a Christian man. Among Bill's final wishes would that his life would reflect the love of Jesus. He looked forward to seeing all of his family and friends in heaven.
After his passing, his family found a small folded note tucked in his wallet. It read, simply:
"The longest journey starts with the first step."
Our "Up North Friend" will be surely loved and will be deeply missed.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to Spider Lake Church